DEA Classifies Soma as a Schedule IV Controlled Substance

In December 2011, the Drug Enforcement Agency decided to federally control carisoprodol as a Schedule IV controlled substance under the Controlled Substance Act (CSA). This law went into effect on January 11, 2012.

If you are a pharmacy tech, it’s important for you to know that carisoprodol is now subject to the same laws and regulations as other Schedule IV drugs in a pharmacy. However, certain storage, manufacturing and freight forwarding security requirements are not applicable until April 10, 2012. Package labeling must also be compliant, with “C-IV” present on the label, by this same date.

To determine if a drug should be considered a controlled substance, the DEA must determine that there is sufficient evidence of eight factors.

  • Factor One: The actual or relative potential for abuse. Abuse is defined as using a drug for nonmedical purposes for its positive psychoactive effects.
  • Factor Two: The scientific evidence of the drug’s pharmacological effect. and the state of current scientific knowledge regarding the drug.
  • Factor Three: The state of current scientific knowledge regarding carisoprodol.
  • Factor Four: Carisoprodol’s history and current pattern of abuse.
  • Factor Five: The scope, duration, and significance of abuse.
  • Factor Six: The risk to the public health.
  • Factor Seven: Its psychic or physiological dependence potential.
  • Factor Eight: Whether the substance is an immediate precursor* of a substance already controlled.

*Definition when used as a chemistry term: a chemical that is transformed into another compound, as in the course of a chemical reaction, and therefore precedes that compound in the synthetic pathway

After reviewing the evidence presented by the FDA and others promoting the controlling of carisoprodol, the DEA found that it was sufficient to prove that carisoprodol should be federally controlled.

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4 thoughts on “DEA Classifies Soma as a Schedule IV Controlled Substance

  1. James D Newman says:

    I knew this was going to happen. My ex wife used to take these things like they were candy. It was just a matter of time. Prediction: Neurontin is the next Prescription that is going to be moved into the Controlled Drug Class. Probably a CIII or maybe a CIV, Mark my words.

  2. Dr. Rx says:

    Very doubtful neurontin will be a scheduled drug. It is basically useless. Many patients take 1000mg per dose! It is over-hyped and underwhelming.

  3. Susan S says:

    I have been taking this medication for years. Because I’m allergic to almost every opiate made and I have severe back problems (cervical & lumbar stenosis, 4 herniated discs and scoliosis) and 1 kidney, I’m pretty restricted as to what I can take. I’m supposed to take them 3 times per day. I take ONE at night only, unless I’m in such severe pain, that I might take 2 in one day. My monthly Rx lasts from 4/5 mos normally. I suppose this can be abused but even OTC Tylenol PM can be abused. Should THAT be a Sched. 4 drug, too?!? It all comes down to the individual. I shouldn’t be made to feel like an addict simply because this is the only relief, medically I can find. I’m sure there are a LOT more like me than there are those who abuse. NOTE: the worst, legal, addictive drug is alcohol, but that’s not any type of “scheduled” drug.

  4. Teresa Hogan says:

    I’ve taken these for years, and am not addicted. I cannot take opioids, and this is the best muscle relaxer I’ve ever taken. I don’t feel the need to take daily, but it’s nice to have them when needed. I have known people to get addicted, but I don’t ffel the urge, or need. Only when my back is really bothering me….

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